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Album Review- Falz‘s Stories That Touch

Falz’s sophomore album, Stories That Touch is a collection of records that, true to its origin, tells worthy stories- From emotional stories to inspirational, humorous and even instructional. It’s also a collection that has been properly produced and mastered with competent lyrics, hence a sophomore that does not fall short.

Folarin Falana, who is a trained but non-practicing lawyer, carved a humorous style of rap, which put him in a lane unoccupied by any other rapper, thus giving him the unique leverage he needed to push his work and that work has been well received.

Kabiyesi (track 1)- a proper opener-  features Oyinkansola and is an ode to God as it employs the effusive nature of the ‘oriki (known as praise)’ used by the Yoruba people to praise their traditional ruler or, in some quarters, God. Soft Work (track 2) features well-grounded rap delivery from Falz on a pulsating and enjoyable beat, accompanied by an infectious hook.

My People (track 3), with its Afrobeat influence, is another well produced rap record about the harsh realities of the Nigerian system and the lengths people go to make ends meet; important to note that the voice on the hook is similar to 2 Face’s although the album credits doesn’t list his name.  Karashika (track 4) is a single that had been birthed months before the album arrived but it hasn’t lost its novelty. A tell of how good the record is- it features a rap contribution from Phyno that fits aptly and a humorous comic addition from Chi gul.

Workaholic (track 5) harps on the importance of rest because those who work hard and do not rest could collapse. He sings; ‘workaholic chill o, you nor go carry money go heaven.Simi’s voice feels pure and untainted on the melodious Soldier (track 6) and they complement each other properly especially when they start to vocally confront each other, towards the end of the song. Clap (track 7), which features Reminisce is up-beat and has the Trap music feel to it (Future’s music perfectly describes trap music).

Time Difference (track 8) is a story about lovers on different continents which features well composed lyrics and a passionate and smooth RnB offering from Sess. The Reekado Banks assisted Celebrity Girlfriend (track 9) is a groovy, playful and entertaining story about certain female celebrities that catch Falz’s fancy.

 

Chardonnay Music which features Poe and Chyn is our favourite song on the record. It starts with an instrumental lent from the Jazz genre and leads to purposeful rap from Falz which gives way for Poe and his worthy and consistent wordplay, proving that he has got his rap game locked down and finally Chyn who doesn’t water down the quality the song started with- Chardonnay Music is the song other rappers would listen to for rap lessons. Kawosoke (track 11) is kind of a weak song but the very first one on the album.

Love You (track 12) as assisted by Bez is based on a cultural-esque production and asides’ handling the hook, Bez gets to show the premium stuff he’s made off when he offers a proper, low-toned verse towards the end. Karashika the remix (track 13) starts with off a funny word play, from MI, about the wiles of Karashika, her booty and other features begging the Lord to save him. Show Dem Camp continues in the same vein and Falz ends.

Everybody (Thank You)- (track 14)- is Falz’s thank you to everyone who  has supported his career till date. It’s driven by proficient production and in general is a compelling enough thank you for the people, Falz intended his gratitude for. Ello Bae (track 15), is the final song and a befitting end- it’s alive with that niche rap from Falz and the inclusion of a widely used word in pop culture, ‘Bae, in its title is a good strategy- it piqued the attention of people.

Stories That Touch is a rap record which is evidence that the comical approach Falz has adopted doesn’t in any way indicate lack of depth many serious rappers, have. It’s a good one and 1 weak song out of 15 is an A, any day any time. At the very least, a B+.

Written by Ade Tayo